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authorHernani Marques <hernani@ccc-ch.ch>2018-06-27 10:55:18 +0200
committerHernani Marques <hernani@ccc-ch.ch>2018-06-27 10:55:18 +0200
commitfe54867c75e2aeb14b1420a08d7711899ffee512 (patch)
tree8e4ddc4d1da9b464bad7792ee948601923e74841
parent6ac64e16ee69704579ebfd942183e04f32f60590 (diff)
doc: typos
-rw-r--r--doc/documentation/chapters/philosophy.texi10
-rw-r--r--doc/documentation/chapters/user.texi6
2 files changed, 8 insertions, 8 deletions
diff --git a/doc/documentation/chapters/philosophy.texi b/doc/documentation/chapters/philosophy.texi
index 148f0cd91..72c3476a3 100644
--- a/doc/documentation/chapters/philosophy.texi
+++ b/doc/documentation/chapters/philosophy.texi
@@ -161,11 +161,11 @@ The second part describes concepts specific to anonymous file-sharing.
Almost all peer-to-peer communications in GNUnet are between mutually
authenticated peers. The authentication works by using ECDHE, that is a
-DH (Diffie---Hellman) key exchange using ephemeral eliptic curve
-cryptography. The ephemeral ECC (Eliptic Curve Cryptography) keys are
+DH (Diffie---Hellman) key exchange using ephemeral elliptic curve
+cryptography. The ephemeral ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography) keys are
signed using ECDSA (@uref{http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECDSA, ECDSA}).
The shared secret from ECDHE is used to create a pair of session keys
-@c FIXME: LOng word for HKDF. More FIXMEs: Explain MITM etc.
+@c FIXME: Long word for HKDF. More FIXMEs: Explain MITM etc.
(using HKDF) which are then used to encrypt the communication between the
two peers using both 256-bit AES (Advanced Encryption Standard)
and 256-bit Twofish (with independently derived secret keys).
@@ -174,12 +174,12 @@ authenticates each packet
without requiring signatures each time. GNUnet uses SHA-512
(Secure Hash Algorithm) hash codes to verify the integrity of messages.
-@c Fixme: A while back I got the feedback that I should try and integrate
+@c FIXME: A while back I got the feedback that I should try and integrate
@c explanation boxes in the long-run. So we could explain
@c "man-in-the-middle" and "man-in-the-middle attacks" and other words
@c which are not common knowledge. MITM is not common knowledge. To be
@c selfcontained, we should be able to explain words and concepts used in
-@c a chapter or paragraph without hinting at wikipedia and other online
+@c a chapter or paragraph without hinting at Wikipedia and other online
@c sources which might not be available or accessible to everyone.
@c On the other hand we could write an introductionary chapter or book
@c that we could then reference in each chapter, which sound like it
diff --git a/doc/documentation/chapters/user.texi b/doc/documentation/chapters/user.texi
index f2dc5b35d..4a82295c4 100644
--- a/doc/documentation/chapters/user.texi
+++ b/doc/documentation/chapters/user.texi
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ start of @command{gnunet-gtk}).
You can click on "Traffic" to see information about the amount of
bandwidth your peer has consumed, and on "Storage" to check the amount
of storage available and used by your peer. Note that "Traffic" is
-plotted cummulatively, so you should see a strict upwards trend in the
+plotted cumulatively, so you should see a strict upwards trend in the
traffic.
@node Peer Information
@@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ a little area for downloading appears.
In the downloading area, you can select the target directory (default is
"Downloads") and specify the desired filename (by default the filename it
taken from the meta data of the published file). Additionally, you can
-specify if the download should be anonynmous and (for directories) if
+specify if the download should be anonymous and (for directories) if
the download should be recursive. In most cases, you can simply start
the download with the "Download!" button.
@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ rules - GO0T87F9BPMF8NKD5A54L2AH1T0GRML539TPFSRMCEA98182QD30
@subsection The GNS Tab
@c %**end of header
-Maintaing your zones is through the NAMESTORE service and is discussed
+Maintaining your zones is through the NAMESTORE service and is discussed
here. You can manage your zone using @command{gnunet-identity} and
@command{gnunet-namestore}, or most conveniently using
@command{gnunet-namestore-gtk}.