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@@ -270,248 +270,6 @@
270 $ gnunet-arm -e 270 $ gnunet-arm -e
271 </code> 271 </code>
272 272
273
274 <h3>{{ _("Make sure it works") }}</h3>
275
276 <p>
277 Let's try out some of GNUnet's use cases. Some should be done
278 before others:
279 </p>
280
281 <ul>
282 <li>filesharing</li>
283 <li>A simple chat using CADET</li>
284 <li>Name resolution using GNS on the command line</li>
285 <li>Name resolution using GNS with a browser (do it on the command line first)</li>
286 <li>Serving a website using VPN (do name resolution with a browser first)</li>
287 </ul>
288
289 <h4>{{ _("filesharing") }}</h4>
290
291 <p>
292 Let's publish a file in the GNUnet filesharing network. We use the keywords
293 ("commons" and "state") so other people will be able to search for the file.
294 </p>
295
296 <p>
297 We can choose any file and describe it with meaningful keywords (using the
298 `-k` command line option).
299 </p>
300
301 <code>
302 $ gnunet-publish -k commons -k state ostrom.pdf<br>
303 Publishing `/home/myself/ostrom.pdf' done.<br>
304 URI is `gnunet://fs/chk/M57SXDJ72EWS25CT6307KKJ8K0GCNSPTAZ649NA1NS10MJB4A1GZ9EN4Y02KST9VA5BHE8B335RPXQVBWVZ587Y83WQ7J3DHMBX30Q8.DHNGBN4CB2DBX1QRZ1R0B1Q18WTEAK4R94S9D57C9JMJJ3H7SSQDCV4D1218C4S2VP085AMQQSMG18FCP6NQMZQZJ91XR5NBX7YF0V0.42197237'.
305 </code>
306
307
308 <p>Finding the file by keyword works with `gnunet-search`.</p>
309
310 <code>
311 $ gnunet-search commons<br>
312 #1:<br>
313 gnunet-download -o "ostrom.pdf" gnunet://fs/chk/M57SXDJ72EWS25CT6307KKJ8K0GCNSPTAZ649NA1NS10MJB4A1GZ9EN4Y02KST9VA5BHE8B335RPXQVBWVZ587Y83WQ7J3DHMBX30Q8.DHNGBN4CB2DBX1QRZ1R0B1Q18WTEAK4R94S9D57C9JMJJ3H7SSQDCV4D1218C4S2VP085AMQQSMG18FCP6NQMZQZJ91XR5NBX7YF0V0.42197237
314 </code>
315
316 <p>
317 It gives us the command line call to download the file (and store it as
318 ostrom.pdf)!
319 </p>
320
321 <h4>{{ _("CADET (and Chat)") }}</h4>
322
323 <p>
324 We can use the `gnunet-cadet` command line tool to open a port and from
325 another machine connect to this port and chat or transfer data. First we need
326 our *peer ID* of the GNUnet peer opening the port.
327 </p>
328
329 <code>
330 $ gnunet-peerinfo -s<br>
331 I am peer `P4T5GHS1PCZ06R82D3KW8Z8J1113BQZWAWGYHTZ8G1ZXMWXQGAVG'.
332 </code>
333
334
335 <p>
336 Now we open the port (it can be any string!):
337 </p>
338
339 <code>
340 $ gnunet-cadet -o my-secret-port
341 </code>
342
343 <p>
344 On the other machine we can connect using the peer ID and the port
345 and start chatting!
346 </p>
347
348 <code>
349 $ gnunet-cadet P4T5GHS1PCZ06R82D3KW8Z8J1113BQZWAWGYHTZ8G1ZXMWXQGAVG my-secret-port
350 </code>
351
352 <h4>{{ _("Name resolution using GNS on the command line") }}</h4>
353
354 <p>
355 GNS is the GNU name service, a fully decentralized alternatice to
356 DNS. We'll publish an IP address in a GNS record try to resolve it
357 on the command line. First we need an identity which is the
358 equivalent to a zone in DNS. We'll call it "myself" and create it
359 using the `gnunet-identity` command line tool. Instead of "myself"
360 you can surely use your nick or any other name.
361 </p>
362
363 <code>
364 $ gnunet-identity -C myself
365 </code>
366
367 <p>
368 We can check if it worked using the same tool. We expect the name
369 of our identity and the corresponding public key to be
370 displayed.
371 </p>
372
373 <code>
374 $ gnunet-identity -d<br>
375 myself - HWTYD3P5D77JVFNVMZ1M5T10V4SZYNMY3PCGQCSVENKD6ZCRKPMG
376 </code>
377
378 <p>
379 Now we add a public `A` record to our zone. It has the name "ccc", a value
380 of "195.54.164.39" and it expires after one day.
381 </p>
382
383 <code>
384 $ gnunet-namestore -z myself -a -e "1 d" -p -t A -n ccc -V 195.54.164.39
385 </code>
386
387 <p>
388 Now we can query that record using the command line tool `gnunet-gns`.
389 </p>
390
391 <code>
392 $ gnunet-gns -t A -u ccc.myself<br>
393 ccc.myself:<br>
394 Got `A' record: 195.54.164.39
395 </code>
396
397 <p>
398 So it worked! But only resolving our own records is boring. So we
399 can give our identity (the public key of it to be precise) to
400 someone else so they can try to resolve our records, too. The
401 other person (Bob) has to add it to his namestore like this:
402 <p>
403
404 <code>
405 $ gnunet-namestore -z myself -a -e never -p -t PKEY -n alice -V HWTYD3P5D77JVFNVMZ1M5T10V4SZYNMY3PCGQCSVENKD6ZCRKPMG
406 </code>
407
408 <p>
409 Our identity in Bobs namestore is a public record (-p) and never
410 expires (-e never). Now Bob (let's assume he has called his identity
411 myself, too) should be able to resolve our "ccc" record, too!
412 </p>
413
414 <code>
415 $ gnunet-gns -t A -u ccc.alice.myself<br>
416 ccc.alice.myself:<br>
417 Got `A' record: 195.54.164.39
418 </code>
419
420 <p>
421 It can continue like this. A friend of Bob would be able to
422 resolve our records too because Bob published our identity in a
423 public record. Bobs friend would simply use "ccc.alice.bob.myself"
424 to resolve our "ccc" record.
425 </p>
426
427
428 <h4>{{ _("Name resolution using GNS with a browser") }}</h4>
429
430 <p>
431 In the previous use case "Name resolution using GNS on the
432 command line" we got an idea about what GNS is about, but now
433 let's use it with a browser, to make it actually useful. Currently
434 Firefox and Chromium are known to work.
435 </p>
436
437 <p>
438 Many websites enforce HTTPS and thus provide certificates for
439 their hostnames (and not our GNS names). Browsers don't like wrong
440 hostnames in certificates and will present error messages. So
441 GNUnet has to trick them by generating own certificates for our
442 GNS names. This means we need to create our own certificate
443 authority and tell our browser about it. Luckily there's a script
444 for it:
445 </p>
446
447 <code>
448 $ gnunet-gns-proxy-setup-ca
449 </code>
450
451 <p>
452 After executing this script the Browser has to be restarted.
453 </p>
454
455 <p>
456 GNUnet provides a proxy service (gnunet-gns-proxy) that the
457 browser can send DNS and HTTP traffic to. It will try to resolve
458 names with GNS first and forward the rest of the DNS traffic to
459 the system's DNS resolver. It will also take care of the HTTP
460 traffic, so the browser gets valid certificates and the web server
461 will not be confused by our GNS hostnames. Our GNS namestore
462 doesn't know about any DNS hostnames yet, so we have to store
463 them, too. For our "ccc" A record, we have to store a LEHO (legacy
464 hostname) record, too. It must contain the website's original DNS
465 hostname:
466 </p>
467
468 <code>
469 $ gnunet-namestore -z myself -a -e "1 d" -p -t LEHO -n ccc -V www.ccc.de
470 </code>
471
472 <p>
473 Now let's start gnunet-gns-proxy.
474 </p>
475
476 <code>
477 $ /usr/lib/gnunet/libexec/gnunet-gns-proxy
478 </code>
479
480 <p>
481 Our browser has to be configured so it uses our proxy. In Firefox
482 we have to set these options under "about:config":
483 </p>
484
485 <code>
486 network.proxy.socks: localhost<br>
487 network.proxy.socks_port: 7777<br>
488 network.proxy.socks_remote_dns true<br>
489 network.proxy.type: 1
490 </code>
491
492 <p>
493 To tell Chromium to use the proxy, it has to be started with the
494 "--proxy-server" command line option:
495 </p>
496
497 <code>
498 $ chromium --proxy-server="socks5://127.0.0.1:7777"
499 </code>
500
501 <p>
502 Now we should be able to resolve our GNS names in the browser! We
503 just have to type "https://ccc.myself" into the address bar. If
504 our friend Bob prepared his system, too, he can resolve our record
505 by typing "ccc.alice.myself".
506 </p>
507
508
509 <h4>{{ _("VPN") }}</h4>
510
511 <p>
512 TBD
513 </p>
514
515 <h3>{{ _("Uninstall GNUnet and its dependencies") }}</h3> 273 <h3>{{ _("Uninstall GNUnet and its dependencies") }}</h3>
516 274
517 <code> 275 <code>
@@ -528,12 +286,6 @@
528 $ sudo rm /lib/$(uname -m)-linux-gnu/libnss_gns.so.2 286 $ sudo rm /lib/$(uname -m)-linux-gnu/libnss_gns.so.2
529 </code> 287 </code>
530 288
531 <h3>{{ _("Appendix A: Optional GNUnet features") }}</h3>
532
533 <p>
534 TBD
535 </p>
536
537 <h3>{{ _("Troubleshooting") }}</h3> 289 <h3>{{ _("Troubleshooting") }}</h3>
538 290
539 <h4>{{ _("You can't reach other people's nodes") }}</h4> 291 <h4>{{ _("You can't reach other people's nodes") }}</h4>